This is how I made my Nokia 9300’s file system available to my Ubuntu Dapper box. I can now copy/move files around, as well as edit files on the phone just like I could earlier with the 9210.

Browsing the 9300 in Nautilus
Browsing the phone’s filesystem in Nautilus

You need a working Bluetooth setup. See my earlier Bluetooth related HOWTO on how to find out your phone’s Bluetooth address with the hcitool and how to setup a PIN so you can pair the devices in a friendly fashion. You need to have portmap installed (in order to use any kind of NFS shares). Then you need the key ingredient, p3nfs. Download the ARCH Linux binary package and the corresponding nfsapp SIS installer for the 9300/9500.

1. Install nfsapp on the phone (send the file over via Bluetooth, or browse to the p3nfs homepage with the phone’s browser and download it)
2. Convert the ARCH linux binary package of p3nfs into a debian package and install it: sudo alien -i p3nfs-x.xx.pkg.tar.gz
3. Set the suid bit on /usr/bin/p3nfsd so that you don’t have to be root to access the phone’s filesystem: sudo chmod+s /usr/bin/p3nfsd
4. Bind an rfcomm device to your phone. The nfsapp uses the Bluetooth channel 13: sudo rfcomm bind /dev/rfcomm0 XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX 13 (XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX being your phone’s address)
5. Start nfsapp on the phone. Check that it’s using Bluetooth/13 to communicate. If not, press ‘p’ to change it
6. Make a convenient mount point in your home directory, such as ‘Phone’
7. Start p3nfsd: p3nfsd -series80 -tty /dev/rfcomm0 -dir /home/<username>/Phone
8. Browse to the Phone directory with a file manager or in the terminal
9. when you’re done, exit any application, file browser or terminal accessing the ‘Phone’ directory and unmount the phone: ls /home/<username>/Phone/exit — wait for output confirming that p3nfsd has exited cleanly

You would probably prefer not to type all those commands by hand every day, so make a few nice aliases in your ~/.bashrc:
alias bindcomm=’sudo rfcomm bind /dev/rfcomm0 XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX 13′
alias mountphone=’p3nfsd -series80 -tty /dev/rfcomm0 -dir /home/username/Phone’
alias umountphone=’ls /home/username/Phone/exit’

NOTE: Do not mess with files on the E: and Z: “drives” on the phone. They belong the running system’s internal memory and touching that stuff may crash the phone and perhaps make it unbootable.

NOTE: This HOWTO is just a quick list of steps to get this working. It is not a substitute for actually reading the p3nfs README file. The p3nfs documentation also deals with situations when things are not working. I won’t, so don’t call me for support :)

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Comments

4 Responses to “Mounting the Nokia 9300 file system on Linux with p3nfs”

  1. Syncing Smartphones And Evolution: Web2.0 and Old School : the new topyli standard on June 25th, 2007 17:34

    [...] Mac. I have tackled this problem from many angles in the past, from the struggle to achieve simple file transfers between Nokia phones and Linux boxen, to the quest for calendar and address book sync, to accessing [...]

  2. Mounting a Nokia Phone a Little Bit Easier : the new topyli standard on July 25th, 2007 23:58

    [...] have been using p3nfs to mount my Nokia 9300 and later the E70, and it has worked pretty well. However, all this time the fuse and bluez hackers [...]

  3. TuxFeed › Syncing Smartphones And Evolution: Web2.0 and Old School on August 3rd, 2007 00:44

    [...] Mac. I have tackled this problem from many angles in the past, from the struggle to achieve simple file transfers between Nokia phones and Linux boxen, to the quest for calendar and address book sync, to accessing [...]

  4. TuxFeed › Mounting a Nokia Phone a Little Bit Easier on August 3rd, 2007 00:45

    [...] source post I have been using p3nfs to mount my Nokia 9300 and later the E70, and it has worked pretty well. However, all this time the fuse and bluez hackers [...]